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St John’s Buildings barrister Lorraine Cavanagh has been approved for appointment as a Queen’s Counsel (QC).

She will formally become a Silk when she makes her declaration before the lord chancellor at a ceremony on 11 March.

Cavanagh, who was called to the Bar in 2000, has expertise in complex children cases and also practices in health and welfare matters before the Court of Protection.

She regularly acts in medical treatment cases for children and adults and conducts judicial review and human rights claims, focusing on community care provision and child rights.

Cavanagh is among 30 women out of 108 successful applicants to be appointed a Silk this year. Appointments are made by The Queen on the advice of the lord chancellor, David Gauke MP, following consideration by the independent Queen’s Counsel selection panel.

Richard Norton, head of chambers at St John’s Buildings, said: “With her track record of acting in complex children law cases, Lorraine has demonstrated superb knowledge and a longstanding dedication to the profession–she is truly deserving of the appointment.”

He added: “Lorraine is the fourth member of our family team to become Silk. Her appointment adds further gravitas to our already outstanding group of family law barristers.”

Chair of the selection panel, Sir Alex Allan, commented: “I am delighted at the announcement of the new silks. I congratulate each one of them. The selection process is a rigorous and demanding one. We collect confidential assessments from judges, fellow advocates and professional clients, who give freely of their time to provide evidence about an applicant’s demonstration of the competencies. Those applicants who are not filtered out following consideration of the assessments are then interviewed by two members of the Selection Panel, following which the whole Panel discuss all the evidence on each interviewed applicant.”

He added: “We remain concerned that the number of female applicants remains comparatively low, but I am pleased that of those women who did apply, over 60% were successful. I was also pleased to note that 18 BAME applicants were appointed, a record number.”

“Each year, the panel has the difficult task of identifying the truly excellent advocates. I am confident that those appointed today truly deserve to be Queen’s Counsel.”

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